child_r.gif (3160 bytes)i'chana

Richana.gif (23286 bytes)

 

Symbol- The ri’chana have no symbol, though each individual often has his own totem animal, and dresses in the skin of the animal.

Prime Stats- In/St

Skills- The ri’chana get following skills (note, this is instead of the normal first level development):

RI'CHANA

     

Skill

Rank

Skill

Rank

Fauna Lore

2

Chant

2

Flora Lore

3

Ritual

2

Herb Lore

3

Body Dev

1

Spirit Lore

3

Meditation

2

Story-Telling

3

Drug Tolerance

2

Weapon 1

2

Religion: Ursani

3

Weapon 2

1

First Aid

3

Dance

3

   

Customary Garb- The ri’chana have no uniform, as such, though they often dress in the skins and furs of their totem animal. Many of them wear thick leather breeches when going into the wild. During their rituals they don large wooden masks in the shape of their totem animal. Like all Ursani they decorate themselves in tattoos.

Special Requirements- A ri’chana must have an IN of 85 or over, and a ST of 70.

Membership- Membership is restricted to Ursani males. The majority of tribes have only one ri’chana, though the larger or more prosperous tribes sometimes employ two or three.

Culture- Every Ursani tribe and village has a ri’chana. Like the chiefs, they are considered Gi’lac. The ri’chana are the Ursani’s link with the gods, and communicate regularly with Vri’jinka and Tiran’ca. They are also considered to be a doorway to the spirits, especially the Gor’nana, the Totem Spirit of the tribe. Each tribe as its own Gor’nana, which often takes the form of a humanoid animal. The Gor’nana is responsible for protecting the tribe, and ensuring prosperity. Unlike most religions, the Ursani do not feel the need to appease the spirit- after all, it is the spirit of their tribe.

ri’chana’s are chosen by both the chief and the ri’chana’s predecessor. Formal training is not given, and the ri’chana is expected to learn as he goes along. However, the initiation involves communion and possession by the totem animal; if, for some reason, this ritual fails, the ri’chana is dishonoured and must step down, and another takes his place. Of course, it would take a peculiarly honest Ursani to admit that kind of failure.

Restrictions- All ri’chana must be Ursani, and part of the tribe. Only males are allowed. Apart from that there are few restrictions, apart from those imposed by the tribe. A ri’chana who is unable to contact the spirits is usually quickly disposed of.

Structure- The ri’chana are part of the Gi’lac, the highest social caste in Morrim society. They offer spiritual advice to all the Ursani, and often serve as the Chief’s main advisor. It is considered taboo to lay a hand on the ri’chana, and anybody harming one will be killed. Only once the chief has decided that a ri’chana is not competent is the taboo lifted.

Philosophy/Purpose- The ri’chana fulfil a number of functions in Ursani society. Primarily, they are healers and use salves and herbs to cure sicknesses and disease. They are also fond of blood-letting, which they feel releases the evil spirits. Another function of the ri’chana is to serve as the mouth of the Gor’nana. When an important decision is to be made, the Gor’nana needs to be consulted. The ri’chana invoke the Gor’nana by name and, via a complex ritual (which involves dancing, chanting and drugs) are possessed by the totem. When in this state, the shaman is able to command even the chief. The Gor’nana, as well as being the spirit of the tribe, is also considered the ambassador of the gods, and all must obey it. This ritual, known as the Gor’tuca is also carried out at the beginning of every year, to give the Ursani guidance for the days ahead. During the Gor’tuca the ri’chana will wear a large wooden mask, known as a Gor’mi. The Gor’mi is painted in the style of the Gor’nana’s head, and when wearing this mask the ri’chana is considered to be the embodiment of the spirit.

The ri’chana also communes with the spirits, and helps appease them. If there is famine or a plague, the ri’chana will retreat to his Ni’maton, his holy space, and enter into a trance. This ni’maton is often a small stone circle or a wood-glade, its location unknown to all but the shaman. Anyone entering the ni’maton without permission is likely to be cursed by the spirits.

In order to enter the trances, the ri’chana use Tuc’rina, a small leafy plant which grows in the valleys of the Belestar border. This plant is crushed and smoked through a large wooden pipe, known as a Tuc’rin’co. The shaman then enters an hallucigenic state.

When not communing with the spirits, the ri’chana often wanders away from the town, gathering herbs and leaves for his potions. As well as being a shaman, the ri’chana is often a great warrior too, and will accompany the Urani on any battle.

Holy Days- The Ursani, despite their spirituality, or not fond of dogmatic religions and celebrate few holy days. The main holy day is the Gor’tuca, as mentioned above. This takes place on the first new moon of the year. During this time the ri’chana retreats to his Ni’maton for the whole day to meditate. At night he returns, and the whole tribe chant and dance around a fire, hoping to attract the attention of the totem and summon him into the shaman. The ri’chana, wearing his mask, then announces his plans for the tribe for the coming year. A great feast is then thrown under the stars. This ritual also takes place whenever the Ursani have need.

In addition to this, each tribe celebrates its own unique days, such as the anniversary of a great victory, or the ascension of the chief, or the death of a great hero. In these festivals the ri’chana’s role is more subdued, and only small rituals are necessary.

Spell Lists:

All Shaman Base lists

 

Background Options

Guardian Spirit 10

Fraud- no contact with the spirits -30

Prone to demonic possession –10

Blessed by totem (+10 to stat) 20

Addiction/ Insanity –10

Must forsake 1 level.